Floyd Elzinga

ARTWORK

Pine Cone 48

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone 48

Corten Steel

48 x 27 x 27 in

Pine Cone

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated)

8 x 6 x 6 in

Pine Cone

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone

Weathering Steel

8 x 6 x 6 in

Pine Cone

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone

Weathering Steel

8 x 6 x 6 in

Pine Cone - 19-442

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-442

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated) - Gold Colour

9 x 6 x 6 in

Pine Cone - 19-443

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-443

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated) - Gold Colour

5 x 4 x 4 in

Pine Cone - 19-518

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-518

Powder Coated Steel

8 x 5.50 x 5.50 in

Pine Cone - 19-521

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-521

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated)

12 x 6.50 x 6 in

Pine Cone - 19-522

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-522

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated)

8 x 6 x 6 in

Pine Cone - 19-546

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-546

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated)

8 x 4 x 4 in

Pine Cone - 19-550

Floyd Elzinga

Pine Cone - 19-550

Stainless Steel (Heat Treated)

6 x 4 x 4 in

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Floyd Elzinga
I am drawn to the distinction between polar opposites. Subsequently, duality is an underlying theme in my work. I employ natural and non-traditional sculpting materials to create conceptual sculptures, but more than a decade of steel fabrication has made metals my dominant choice of materials. I was initially drawn to using steel as a material because of its plastic nature. It is a common, fast working material that is very forgiving allowing me to sketch my thoughts in line-drawing style panels and persuasively formed sculptures. As a sculptor, my work is predominately three dimensional, but recently I developed ‘painter envy’ and decided to work “two dimensionally”. This direction gave rise to a series of landscapes where the process became part of the content. I use my welder as a pencil, and my grinder as a paint brush. Nonetheless, these ‘paintings’ are on steel, the pallet is rust, and the work is still three-dimensional. These landscapes have moved from stylized memories of idealized wilderness to actual locations from around Canada. Some works pay homage to the quintessential Canadian landscape made popular by the Group of Seven and others are conjured from memory. My current focus is on seeds and most specifically pine cones. I choose to use the pinecone not only for its complicatedly beautiful geometric natural form but more so for the fact that it is a seed. I am interested in a seed’s reason for being. The seed’s central goal of colonization is reaffirmed by the fact that these large metal pine cones have more in common with machinery and artillery than the natural shapes they resemble. The art I create is a tangled web of pronouncement and investigation summarized in a tangible and critical display of unsettling beauty. My work is simultaneously eternally optimistic and fatally pessimistic but rarely without a hint of humour or glimmer of hope.
https://cdn.artcld.com/img/w_400,h_400,c_fill/gibqanwzh4bccw55sciv.jpg
Artist